NF UNIT P2 Day 11

Day 11

Poem A Day:

 

I chose this song because it inspires the Ted Talk I am working on for this project.

Lyrics are here. 

Mini-lesson:

Today’s objective is: Students will share their projects with peers in small groups so they can develop, clarify and strengthen their ideas.

 

I asked students to have their rough drafts ready today to share in small groups. So, I had to have my Ted talk rough draft ready.

One of the lessons I learned in this unit, and I hope my students will learn, is if you want to do something well, you have to put a lot of time, thought, energy, and effort into that something. And then, you still may not be able to meet your own expectations. But- you may exceed someone else’s.

Anyway, I read my rough draft to the students and showed them my work-in-progress-slideshow. I gathered their suggestions, and ideas, and told them my game plan for finishing this bad boy by Monday.

 Active Engagement:

Students shared their rough drafts in groups of three. They all worked to strengthen their ideas and make sure they were being clear. Final drafts and presentations are due Monday. I secured the school’s theater for presentations, so that is pretty epic and exciting! I will have to take pictures and post them 🙂

Closure

Students share out improvements they will make as a result of today’s work.

NF UNIT P2 Day 9

Poem A Day:

THANKS TO MY BRILLIANT COLLEAGUE AMY BRAZAUSKI, I have this gem for today’s PAD.

 

Mini-lesson:

Today’s objective is: Students will gather information from various reputable sources in order to deepen understanding of a chosen topic.I had a chromebook cart in my room for this one. 

We started today by watching this Ted Talk from Markham Nolan called “How to Separate Fact from Fiction Online.” It was pretty relevant to the work students are doing for their projects.

 

 

At the end of his talk, he says this: “But here’s the thing. Algorithms are rules. They’re binary. They’re yes or no, they’re black or white. Truth is never binary. Truth is a value. Truth is emotional, it’s fluid, and above all, it’s human. No matter how quick we get with computers, no matter how much information we have, you’ll never be able to remove the human from the truth-seeking exercise, because in the end, it is a uniquely human trait.”

We discussed this and our evolving understanding of the genre of nonfiction.

Active Engagement

Students were supposed to have gathered all of their sources and created citations for each source in MLA format. Today, I gave them a “quiz” on Google Classroom. A blank google doc for them to create their works cited page. They could use the Purdue owl link to help them. It was open-note and open-web. I just want students to learn how to do it on their own. They don’t love it.

After they finish their quiz, they have the class to work on gathering information and note-taking for their projects.

Again, students barely looked up from their screens. They did research. I fielded their issues as they arose- as they tend to. 😉

Closure

 

Students shared out the most interesting piece of information they have found so far with a partner (I recently moved desks into partners for another class I teach, but it was useful in this class too for students to have a buddy to bounce ideas off of and to check MLA formatting with).

 

 

NF UNIT P2 Day 3

Day 3

Poem A Day:

You won’t have to ask, but go ahead: Ask the students how they “feel.”

Mini-lesson:

The objective today: Students will understand how nonfiction writers use rhetoric to persuade readers to think a certain way or to act.

For today’s lesson, I stuck to the basics- many of these students have zero background knowledge about rhetoric (the art of persuasion).

I defined the types of rhetoric on the white board and then showed various examples of each. It’s a pretty straight-forward lesson, but the kids love it if you pick good videos.

For Pathos, we discussed the emotions we feel that are strong enough to compel us to act, (fear, hate, love) and discussed how each of the following ads evoked those emotions in the viewer (music, graphics, imagery, suspense, word choice, etc.).

I showed:

Then:

And, finally, of course: (cue the water works).

For Ethos, I gave some examples off of the top of my head (I may or may not have made up a story wherein Ben Roethlisberger takes NyQuil in order to prepare for the big game).

Finally, for Logos, we watched some mac vs. pc ads. There are lots of fun things to choose from out there.

Next, I modeled for students how I found rhetoric in my nonfiction novel for my “capturing reality” project. 

I made sure to emphasize that I found a lot of evidence that the writer of my book, Dave Eggers, spent nearly 200 pages of his book estabilishing Zeitoun’s credibility as a loving husband and father, a hard worker, a responsible member of his community, and most importantly, a heroic and brave man. I told them that I thought this was intentional, and it was ethos-

I discussed the several moments Zeitoun has where he is feeding dogs and then thinks about what happens to them once he is captured and can no longer take care of them. The anecdotes about dead dogs? Pathos.

This tied the whole lesson together. I cannot stress the importance of modeling your thinking and reading for students. This is how they learn to do it.

Active Engagement:

Next students had time to delve into their books and look for ethos, pathos or logos.

Closure

I reminded students to read their books, and continue brainstorming ideas for their projects.